Rose Brand Know-How Blog

Entertainment & event production tips, news & stories

Project Management and Custom Sewing for the American Repertory Theater

Stephen Setterlun, Technical Director at the American Repertory Theater at Harvard University, was staring down a fast approaching opening for Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812. His production specs called for over 60 Marvel Velour fabric panels in Rouge, each in a unique size, many with different hanging finishes. He needed the reassurance that his project would be completed on time with precision, technical skill, and closely matched dye lots of fabric. 

With the pressure of the short deadline looming, Setterlun turned to Rose Brand’s project management team. He was impressed with Rose Brand’s large stock of fabrics and sewing capacity. When discussing the project, he felt reassured when “a number of individuals from Rose Brand responded very quickly with a plan and a commitment to make it work on time.” More...

What You Need to Know About Acoustics (Part 3)

Stage Curtain at Baruch College
Photo: Todd Kaplan

 Rose Brand has partnered with our friends at Stages Consultants to create a blog series about the acoustical applications of fabrics. In this 3-part series, we discuss some of the more common approaches for using fabrics in performance spaces and also the things to consider when choosing a fabric for your project.

Read Part 1 here.
Read Part 2 here.

In this third and final installment, we look at some acoustic data for Rose Brand’s fabrics and discuss how these differences might be applied in room acoustics optimization.

 

What’s It All About? 

We are looking at ways to use fabric primarily to provide sound absorption in rooms. Sound absorption reduces reverberation and loudness, and can also control reflections that may create strange sound images, echoes, or resonances. The quantity, concentration and distribution of sound absorptive materials in a room will vary depending on several factors; room size, the shape of the room, and the types of activities that will take place in the space. More...

What You Need to Know About Acoustics (Part 2)

Window Curtains at Baruch College
Photo: Todd Kaplan 

 

Rose Brand has partnered with our friends at Stages Consultants to create a blog series about the acoustical applications of fabrics. In this 3-part series, we’ll discuss some of the more common approaches for using fabrics in performance spaces and also the things to consider when choosing a fabric for your project.

In our last blog installment we gave an overview  on use of Rose Brand fabrics in performance space acoustics. In this second installment we take a closer look at the acoustically important differences between fabrics and identify some considerations in choosing the right fabric and integrating it into your design.

Read Part 1 here.
Read Part 3 here.

 

The Acoustical Differences in Fabrics

Fundamentally, absorption of sound occurs when air molecules interact with the pores of a porous material. Acoustical energy, transmitted through air, is dissipated as a result of viscous effects and thermal conduction with the material. The effective absorption of a material is determined by a combination of characteristics: the porosity and thickness of the material, how deeply air penetrates it, whether it is mounted to a hard or soft backing, and whether there’s an airspace behind it. More...

What You Need to Know About Acoustics (Part 1)

Main Curtain and Window Curtains at Baruch College 
Photo: Todd Kaplan 

Rose Brand has partnered with our friends at Stages Consultants to create a blog series about the acoustical applications of fabrics. In this 3-part series, we’ll discuss some of the more common approaches for using fabrics in performance spaces and also the things to consider when choosing a fabric for your project.

Read Part 2 here.
Read Part 3 here.

Why Are Acoustics Important?

One of the basic goals of room acoustics is controlling reverberation, or the persistence of sound in a room after the source is silenced.  While sometimes the goal is to create “live” spaces with longer reverberation times for a concert hall, more often you are looking for ways to make a room’s acoustics less reverberant, especially in theatre and studio spaces. Adding sound absorbing material to a room will reduce its reverberation time and the perceived loudness of sound. Shorter reverberation times enhance sound clarity, improve speech intelligibility, and reduce loudness.  This allows better communication between performers and audiences at comfortable volumes. It also improves source localization, including surround sound effects. 

Why Fabric? More...