Rose Brand Know-How Blog

Entertainment & event production tips, news & stories

How to Create Scrim Panels that Move

 

 

Rose Brand congratulates our sixth blog contest winner, the team at Church on the Move. Their blog entry described how they built  scrim panels that are vertically mobile for their Seeds Conference.  Here is how THEY did it...  

We kept it mostly low-tech (emphasis on mostly) with technology we already knew how to operate and sort out. The impetus for keeping things simple was pretty much culled from self-preservation as we knew the one time we didn’t really desire major technological issues was the opening of our first Seeds session. Go figure.

These 6 sharkstooth scrim panels were custom fabricated out of some larger pieces we had used a few years ago – a local company was able to make this happen for us but scrim material is available in almost any kind of custom size at Rose Brand.

The objective of this element was to project 6 different images on 6 different scrim panels that could raise/lower as needed. Due to the heavily populated stage area overhead, working out the mechanics of the manual raising and lowering process proved to be the biggest challenge. Although not completely groundbreaking, here’s a brief breakdown on how we made it work out for our needs. More...

Flame Retardant Fabrics: What’s the Difference between FR, IFR, DFR and NFR Fabrics?

Match Flame Test

An NFPA 705 match test being performed on a piece of fabric.

Fire safety is serious business and Rose Brand offers years of experience, dedicated support, and practical solutions to keep you and your audiences safe. While local fire codes may vary and local enforcement is open to interpretation and discretion, almost everyone has the same question in mind: Does the fabric self-extinguish if exposed to a small flame?

The goal is to keep accidents involving flame, heat and fabric from spreading rapidly. In the U.S., the most widely followed standard to determine fire resistance in curtain fabric is the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA) 701 standard. This standard specifies a lab test and the limits of allowable burning of curtain fabric. Since the lab test is impractical for spot checking fabrics outside of a formal lab, the NFPA has also established a field (match) test, NFPA 705.

As shown in the photo above, a vertical flame test is used to determine if a drapery fabric resists burning and is self-extinguishing. If a fabric is not sufficiently flame resistant to meet a standard, the fabric is labeled Non Flame Retardant (NFR). Fabrics that meet a self-extinguishing standard are categorized as Flame Retardant (FR), Inherently Flame Retardant (IFR), or Durably Flame Retardant (DFR). The method by which the fabric got to be sufficiently flame resistant determines the specific label.More...

Lighting a Sharkstooth Scrim Part 3 (of 3)

For more information on lighting a scrim check out our following blog posts:

How To Light A Sharkstooth Scrim (Part 1)

How To Light A Sharkstooth Scrim (Part 2)

 

Here is the third article in our series on “How To Light A Scrim.” This article is derived from questions most frequently fielded by our salespeople at Rose Brand.

Does it matter in which direction the “tooth,” or opening in the scrim, is oriented?


Vertical Tooth AlignmentHorizontal tooth Alignment

Vertical tooth alignment (left) Horizontal tooth alignment (right)

The tooth is about twice as high as it is wide, and this is the common orientation when sewing the scrim. The properties of the scrim, however, are not affected if the tooth is rotated. In fact, this may be done to save a user money and more efficiently use the available widths of scrim in stock. 

Another common reason for rotating a scrim is to More...

How To Light A Sharkstooth Scrim (Part 2)

Opaque Scrim

Figure 1: A correctly lit sharkstooth scrim in an opaque state.

For more information on lighting a scrim check out our following blog posts:

How To Light A Sharkstooth Scrim (Part 1)

How To Light A Sharkstooth Scrim (Part 3)

 

The most common placement of lighting instruments for a scrim is above and directly in front of the scrim. However, that isn't the only lighting position that will be effective. Remember: angle angle angle! As long as your lighting is oblique, and can wash the scrim, it doesn't have to be from above. If your scrim is in an extreme downstage position, for example, footlights can be very effective for scrim washes. (In this case, the “spill” light is lost up in the flies, behind the proscenium and/or masking borders.) In a “wing and drop” set, More...

How To Light A Sharkstooth Scrim (Part 1)

For more information on lighting a scrim check out our following blog posts:

How To Light A Sharkstooth Scrim (Part 2)

How To Light A Sharkstooth Scrim (Part 3)

 

One might think that a fabric company has little to do with lighting. After all, while scenery and lighting design are inexorably linked, how important can fabric be to either? Yet the choices a designer makes in fabric, as with all the other elements, will directly affect the final look of the production. This series of articles discusses common types of fabric, why they are used, and challenges they may present to a lighting designer.

ANGLE, ANGLE, ANGLE
Lighting vis-à-vis fabric is nowhere more critical then when dealing with sharkstooth scrim (or simply "scrim" as some refer to it). Lit correctly, a  sharkstooth scrim provides one of the most magical effects: the bleed-through. If the scrim is lit correctly, it can appear completely opaque; as the lighting is changed, the scrim will “dissolve,” allowing the scene behind it to “bleed through” the scrim or the scenery painted on the scrim. Continue the change, and the scrim will disappear completely, as if by magic. But what is the “correct” way More...