Rose Brand Know-How Blog

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How To Choose Your Flame Retardant For Wood and Paper Products

Updated: April 2016

Here is a guide to choosing flame retardants for wood and paper products that you may use on your next gig.  Remember, since FR laws and codes are instituted on a local level, and your local fire marshals or building inspector has the final authority to approve your use of products, invite them into the discussion early. We recommend that you treat and pre-test samples of all of your substrates and then have them approved by the relevant fire safety authority in your area prior to installation. Click on any 'X" in the following chart to get more information about each FR product. Of course, satisfactory fire resistance depends on proper identification of substrates and proper application of the chemical according to the manufacturer's directions.


Wood Flame Retardant Guide

'A' = Approved for Use by Laboratory Testing
'E' = Effective Treatment Based on Field Testing

Wood Products

 FF3 

FF4
(L&P)

 FF6 

MG
702 

 RF-PC 

 RF-WD 

 MG790 

 Xmas 
Tree
Spray

 Jaxsan 

Aqua
Resin

Bamboo

 

 

 

E

 

 

 

E

 

 

Branches          

E

 

E

 

 

Cardboard  

E

A

E

A

E

A

 

 

 

Cellulose Boards        

A

E

A

 

 

 

Evergreens

 

 

         

A

 

 

Hemp Rope

 

E

 

E

 

E

 

 

 

 

Lumber (Raw Wood)  

A

 

A

 

A

A

 

E

E

Plywood

 

A

 

A

 

A

A

 

E

E

Raffia

E

E

E

E

 

E

 

 

 

 

 

More...

How and Where to Get a Really, Really Large Painted Backdrop...Quickly!

 

Oliphant Studio Begins Work on a 20'H x 280'W Custom Painted Backdrop in Rose Brand's Warehouse

Here at Oliphant we paint very large backdrops in a very short time. That is our claim to fame and we take pride in always doing a good job. The actual painting area in our New York City studio is about 20’x 45’ which is pretty small compared to the size and number of drops we produce, but we always figure out how to get the job done. 

So I felt pretty discouraged when production designer Stefan Beckman called during February’s Fashion Week. He was producing the Hermes Launch party and he wanted a 20’x 280’ seamless muslin painted sunset (similar to the paintings of artist Ed Ruscha) and he needed it in a week. Once installed the drop would encircle the room representing a twilight sky behind a turn of the century wharf. It sounded like a great job but I had no earthly idea how I could pull this off in a week. So I did what I often do when I have no idea how to do something; I called my friend Josh at Rose Brand. More...